Muharram (The Start of New Year)


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It is the first month of the Islamic calendar, and its name in its full form is Muharram ul Haram. The Arabic word for this month is Muharram. This month is one of the four holy months of the year, during which fighting is not permitted. After the holy month of Ramadan, it is considered to be the holiest month of the year.

Ashura is the name given to the tenth day of the month of Muharram. Shi’a Muslims lament the misfortune that befell Hussain ibn Ali’s family throughout the month of Muharram, which is more often known as the Month of Mourning.

As a kind of mourning for the death of Husain, Shiites refrain from participating in happy festivities. Instead, Shia Muslims perform several ceremonies to give condolences to Imam Hussain and to memorialize the deceased by praying, reading supplications, and holding charity events. These events are often held around the month of the martyrs’ birthdays. On the day of Ashura, Shia Muslims try to consume as little food as possible; nonetheless, this practice is not considered to be a fast. In order to honour and grieve the Twelve Imams of Shia Islam, Alevis will fast for 10 or twelve days, with each day being dedicated to one of the Imams. This will make them feel as though a very close relative has passed away. As a form of grief for Hussain, some people choose not to consume food or drink and stay away from amusement until zawal (afternoon), barring youngsters, the elderly, and those who are ill. [2] In addition to that, there is a significant ziyarat book titled “Ziyarat Ashura” that is all about Usain. It is customary for followers of Shiism to read this ziyarat on this date.

The tenth day of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic lunar calendar, is designated as the holy day of Ashura, which is one of the most significant holidays in Islam. In general, fasting and mourning are the two primary rituals that are carried out during the day. For Shia Muslims, Ashura coincides with the date on which the Battle of Karbala took place, which resulted in the martyrdom of Hussain ibn Ali, the grandson of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and a member of the Household of Muhammad (Ahl al-Bayt); as a result, it is preeminently an occasion for mourning, and it is frequently marked by commemorative processions. Additionally, according to Muslim legend, it celebrates the day on which God delivered the prophet Moses (Musa) and his followers from Pharaoh by splitting the Red Sea; as a result, it is principally an occasion for obligatory fasting for Sunni Muslims. In North African folk traditions, such as those practised in Morocco and Algeria, the day is historically (though contentiously) a time for celebration, with dance and masquerades frequently playing important roles in the festivities.


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Fatah-e-Azeem

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